“I Write Therefore I Am” Rwituja Gomes Mookherjee, Author Of The Month, February 2018

Posted: February 28, 2018

Rwituja Gomes Mookherjee’s writing explores the various identities of a woman while she draws experience from her own life as well those of other women.

Every month, we recognise 3 among 2500+ contributors, as featured Author of the Month – for their writing that keeps readers engrossed and makes us all think afresh. This month, Rwituja Gomes Mookherjee is one of our 3 featured authors.

Rwituja’s writing reflects upon the often buried side of women and relationships. The craving for intimacy or the desire to be hugged that clings like dew drops on leaves in the morning, even after a woman matures and assumes the role of a parent. Her writing explores those delicate facets of a woman that sometimes keep getting buried under her responsibilities.




You can view her writing on Women’s Web here.

Authors are often asked this question, but everyone has their own reasons, very personal to them. So, why do you write? 

I write therefore I am. From being a diarist to a blogger, writing has been the only form of expression which allowed for a free and uninhibited flow of thoughts. For me, it’s not only a form of storytelling but it provides the much-needed catharsis of emotional turmoil within, enables me to explore human behaviour and helps me to understand my world a lot better.

What do you enjoy reading? Does any of it help your writing?

I enjoy reading fiction about powerful women characters (historical and contemporary), women’s empowerment, and self-help books. I spend hours reading through case studies, articles and research on interpersonal relationships, marriage and equality. Everything I read inspires my outlook, impacts my personal experiences and finds expression in my writings.

When it comes to writing on/for/about women, what questions and issues drive you the most?

Who am I? What do I want? What makes me come alive and be happy? What is my identity? What does it mean to live life on my own terms? How to truly be ‘me?’ How do I want to be remembered? These are some questions that I explore in my writings while navigating through my life experiences as well as those of women I know or have read about.

Could you narrate an issue or incident in your life which you think was gender-related, and you handled it in a way that has made you proud.

After marriage, I was keen to continue using my maiden name but there was much furore about it. My name was my identity and I didn’t believe in losing that. After much negotiation, I agreed to add my husband’s surname only in addition to my maiden name. A part of me felt like I had lost because I gave in but as I continued to live my life on my own terms, I realised that my identity was much more than my name. Today, when I hear my daughter talk about me, she doesn’t only say my name but also about everything else that I do. It makes me feel complete.

Name 3 other writers or bloggers on Women’s Web whose writing you enjoy reading.

Paromita Bardoloi, Ujwala Shenoy Karmarkar and Aindrila Chaudhuri are some of my favourite authors on Women’s Web.

Liked this post?

Register at Women's Web to get our weekly mailer and never miss out on our events, contests & best reads!

Women's Web is an open platform that publishes a diversity of views. Individual posts do not necessarily represent the platform's views and opinions at all times. If you have a complementary or differing point of view, you can request to be a Women's Web contributor too!

Women's Web is a vibrant community for Indian women, an authentic space for us

Learn More

VIDEO OF THE WEEK

Comments

Share your thoughts! [Be civil. No personal attacks. Longer comment policy in our footer!]

NEW in September! Best New Books by Women Authors

Stay updated with our Weekly Newsletter or Daily Summary - or both!

Orange Flower 2018