Over the years, your support has made Women’s Web the leading resource for women in India. Now, it is our turn to ask, how can we make this even more useful for you? Please take our short 5 minute questionnaire – your feedback is important to us!

Why Inclusive Classrooms At School Are Valuable Even For A Neurotypical ‘Normal’ Child!

Inclusive classrooms have a better definition of learning, use customized teaching-learning methods, and provide a true education on what life is and can be.

Are you the parent of a child who is neurotypical…or ‘normal’, of typical development? When you look for a school, do you ask if they have inclusive classrooms, if they admit and actively support children who are neurodivergent: with different life/ learning needs?

Why is it my problem, you ask? It actually very much is.

The need for inclusive classrooms

Teaching a neurodivergent child requires a different kind of teacher and an evolved method of teaching. It requires observing kids, the class, their reactions, and doing what it takes, using technical pedagogical tools to make learning happen in a fun and engaging way for the entire class. I would want that, as a parent of a child, from their school.

Being in inclusive classrooms with children who are different, diverse in all ways from economical/ caste/ gender/ ability/ learning needs/ different families has shown an increase in empathy levels and overall life skills like team work, conflict resolution, et al. I would want that from a school for my kid, regardless of their brain wiring.

Inclusive classrooms have a better definition of learning, use customized teaching-learning methods, and provide a true education on what life is and can be. They show how a child with brain wiring differences is honestly and wholly themselves, no hiding, no need for deflecting and subterfuge. I would want my kid to be him/her/themselves always, refining strengths and not being limited or defined by what they lack.

I would want such inclusive learning for my child

Inclusive classrooms promote peer learning – social behaviour from a child who is socially adept for the child on the spectrum, being true to themselves and saying it as they see it for the child who is neurotypical, seeing examples of courage and perseverance in their lives everyday from factors out of their control. Without rancour.

inclusive classrooms

Image source

Never miss real stories from India's women.

Register Now

Inclusive classrooms build better understanding and acceptance through life for all kids, increased employability and life skills for all kids and a greater sense of belonging and citizenship for these future citizens of our country.

So tell me, will you ask again if a school offers inclusive teaching, and why it does not, when asking for admission? Remember that the school that rejects a child for who they are can’t truly stand behind yours when he/ she/ they need it to. And everyone goes through ups and downs. Many get diagnosed later with learning issues. Those without issues will still need sensitive teachers….is inclusion charity or a child’s right?

And the more parents ask for more inclusive schools, the better the chances of more schools becoming inclusive. Market forces.

Do you want to be included in your workplace with all your abilities and tolerance for when your performance isn’t super amazing? Yep, we are all not so different after all.

Image source: triloks from Getty Image Signature Free for Canva Pro, and Huseyin Bostanci From Getty Images Free for Canva Pro

Liked this post?

Register at Women's Web to get our weekly mailer and never miss out on our events, contests & best reads! Or - get a couple of really cool reads on your phone every day - click here to join our Telegram channel.

Women's Web is an open platform that publishes a diversity of views. Individual posts do not necessarily represent the platform's views and opinions at all times. If you have a complementary or differing point of view, sign up and start sharing your views too!

Comments

About the Author

Sangitha

Sangitha Krishnamurthi is a special educator, blogger and mother of three. Her interests include living a mindful and organic life as much as possible in addition to reading and writing about the reading. read more...

26 Posts | 118,498 Views

Stay updated with our Weekly Newsletter or Daily Summary - or both!

Growth Beyond Career Break

All Categories