Here’s Why ‘Pitch Perfect’ Has Raised The Bar In Terms Of What Women-Helmed Movie Projects Can Do

Posted: November 6, 2015

How often do we get an all-women team as the centrepiece of a movie that also manages to bust stereotypes and double as incredible cinema? Here are 4 reasons why Pitch Perfect is just that – pitch perfect!

Imagine a Hollywood coming-of-age movie that does not talk about boy-girl relationships, parent-child relationships, kids trying to deal with drugs and alcohol and sex, school strife; a movie that doesn’t feature any intimate scenes and does not focus on a character’s discovery of a sense of direction in life a.k.a. nirvana. Surprising? Well, that’s what the Pitch Perfect franchise is.

Starved of sufficient movies in Bollywood to keep the movie buff in me happy (I like to stay away from the ones that make me cringe), I turned to Hollywood a couple of years ago. My exposure to Hollywood was limited to the old classics that we used to watch on TNT as kids on Friday night. Since then I have been making my way down IMDB’s top charts for Hollywood slowly and steadily. Coming back to Pitch Perfect, I discovered the movies through the famous ‘Cups’ song, which randomly showed up on my YouTube playlist one day. I watched both the parts of the movie back-to-back and loved them. And here are the reasons why they bust stereotypes and are still so cool.




The protagonist

We all talk about role models for girls, and here’s one more. Beca Mitchell, the protagonist knows her mind, knows what she wants from life and college or no college, is planning ahead, just like any college kid in real life. This is a refreshing change from other coming-of-age movies, where we are mostly treated to girls still figuring themselves out (Thirteen, Perks of being a wallflower, etc.), or those who have gone overboard. Beca comes across as the normal, slightly adamant, ordinary looking, talented teenager, who makes a better role model for teenage girls.

It’s a musical

While that is reason enough to fall in love with a movie, this is a musical that is unlike most other musicals. It is not romantic, it is not a fairy tale and does not even talk about war and heroism. This is a musical that is just about music, and the love of an all-girls a-capella group for music. Yes, there is the subtle rivalry between the college a-capella groups, but in the end one is treated to loads of amazing music by all the different college groups.

The stereotype breaking characters

The central-to-the-story all girls a-capella group Barden Bellas is a “refreshing mix-up” of characters, even though a tad “displeasing to the eye”. Once you look beyond the looks, the group is pure talent – a closeted lesbian colored rapper, an Asian beatboxer whom no one has ever heard speaking and an oversized Tasmanian with a tenor unmatched. Unfazed by the snide comments that come their way, they work their way through tough competition purely on the basis of their talent to win the International Championship of Collegiate A Cappella. Goes to show young girls that looks can take them only so far, while real talent will always stand by them.

The pair

Well, we can’t really call them the lead pair, since their relationship barely commands 10 minutes of screen time in the whole movie, and most of it is spent creating or listening to music. But it is everything a relationship in real life is. They laugh, watch movies together, fight, and kiss and make up (Spoiler alert: the last scene will definitely set you smiling and make you fall in love with this couple). Their relationship is relate-able and a better example for teens watching the movie than most other movies.

The movie is not without its own flaws, but those are minor compared to the overall message it conveys – Be yourself, know what you want, be ready to take disappointments, and there’s a lot that you can achieve. If you have a teenage son or daughter, do watch this movie with them. You’ll both love it!

Image via Playbuzz.

Founder @Tell-A-Tale - I gobble stories and spit out new ones everyday; travel addict,

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  1. Pingback: Feminist Film Review – Neerja, not your predictable strong woman – This Is My Truth

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