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Order Your Copy Of Women.Mutiny

Posted: March 5, 2021

Order your copy of Women.Mutiny the new release from Women’s Web.

Available on Amazon.

There comes a time when women do not just become aware of the inequities against them, but decide to draw boundaries, and take active steps for making a change. Women mutiny. They might do it in different ways, depending on their circumstances, but mutiny it is, small or big.

In this short story collection by Women’s Web, we see women from all walks of life – young women just stepping out into the wider world, working women, women achievers, homemakers, mothers, grandmothers, and so many more who defy an attempt to box them into a description.

We have 19 stories in all, by 16 authors. Shalini Mullick has two stories – one about a young woman who has consciously tried to move away from her mother’s choices, and another about the intuition a mother has about her child. Ujwala Shenoy Karmarkar makes us sit up and take notice of a grandmother-granddaughter duo united against a social evil, and in another story takes the reader back 200 years with an excellently narrated historical fiction tale. Manisha Sahoo, our 3rd author with 2 stories here, takes us right inside an emergency situation inside a hospital, and in another story inspires us with a woman who wins a victory over a deep seated phobia. Urmi Chakravorty shows us the nuances of the relationship between sisters in law who might almost be of two separate generations, and the stark difference in the choices they make. Prasanna Rao’s protagonist takes a crucial, principled stand against what her family advises, while the protagonist of Barkha Shah’s story has a relaxed first day after her divorce has come through. Garima Kumar Hosangadi’s story is about healing from unexpected trauma that has driven a rift between a loving couple, while Vijayalakshmi Harish writes about how a ‘soulmate’ need not be a spouse, and that a queerplatonic relationship can happen outside a marriage without threatening it. Meha Sharma writes about a young depressed woman whose mother shows her how to draw happiness back to herself, while Swagata Tarafdar takes us into mythology, showing us the depths of a mother’s sorrow at being taken for granted by both her child and her spouse. Shweta Singh’s protagonist shows us that everyone has something they could do really well even if they stumble at the ordinary, and Sangeetha Bhaskaran’s story shows that nothing is so dire that it cannot be dealt with with some calm thinking. Janani Balaji (our youngest writer at 15) writes about childhood sweethearts who can change drastically after they become husband and wife, and Priya Mani tells us about revenge, the dish that is best served cold. Sreemati Sen tackles the deeply ingrained patriarchy that deems a daughter a second class citizen, and Seema Taneja shows how a mother in law realises that she was being THE MOTHER IN LAW for no reason at all!

A feminist anthology that’s a must read.

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