5 Things Our Readers Would Tell Their Child About Puberty [#TuesdayTalkies]

Posted: March 20, 2016

We asked you, our readers, “What would you tell your child about puberty?” Here is what you said about talking to your child about puberty.

The quintessential beginning of adult life can sometimes end-up as an unpleasant experience for a child. The hormonal changes which result in noticeable bodily developments can be extremely distressing for a puzzled mind. In addition, peer pressure among the teenagers in the form of “Arey! Mera to ho gaya, tera nahi hua?” can make the transition even more stressful.

Puberty blues don’t leave anyone untouched. Children might have many questions about puberty, which can be evry difficult to handle, given our social culture of taboo subjects. But as parents it is not only our duty but also our responsibility to explain the changes to our children in a language best understood.

At Women’s Web, we invite readers to share their thoughts on one interesting question that is picked by the team and posted on our Facebook page every Tuesday, calling it #TuesdayTalkies. We try picking questions that would interest readers and put them in their thoughts. Some of the best replies are posted in our next story and one of them also gets to win a ‘Women’s Web’ mug. Why don’t you try your luck in the next week’s question?

The question for this week was, What would you tell your child about puberty? Here are 5 best responses from our readers.

It is part of growing up

I will reassure that her body is normal by telling basic facts of puberty. Make her understand being different is normal. Will keep her more healthy and will help her in developing healthy feelings. –Saisri Krishna

This shall too pass

I would say puberty is like a storm that hits you and feels like a never ending nightmare and before you start to learn to deal or live with it, it’ll be over! –Akshata Bhadranna

Your body is just getting ready for the journey ahead

I will tell her that her body is preparing her for the journey to handle new emotions and life events. I will add that eating healthy, sharing her feelings with me will help her in the journey better. –Haripriya Madhavan

Break the Silence, talk about it

It’s important to talk about puberty and the feelings associated openly so that the child will be prepared for the physical and emotional changes our bodies go through as we grow. He or she should be assured that everyone goes through this and it’s absolutely normal if there is amount of variation in the timing of these milestones. – Arpita Subhadarshini

No matter what I am always here for you

I will tell him or her that the time ahead might be tough, but they are tougher. I will give them the lessons on sex education with all the transparency and clarity which our schools sadly lack in imparting, even today. I will assure the child that I’m always there as a friend and guide, even if they feel it’s the opposite, sometimes. Finally, I will ensure that they understand the true meaning of the terms ‘freedom’ and ‘responsibilities’ by giving them practical experiences in both. –Kasturi Patra

Have some different advice? Comment below and let us know! You could also check our Facebook page to stay in touch with us and know our question for the next #TuesdayTalkies.

Image source: mother and pre-teen son by Shutterstock.

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