Why There Is No Place For Guilt In Asking A Gynaecologist Questions!

Posted: June 11, 2017
Want to get more freelance writing opportunities? Sign up for a Women's Web workshop in Mumbai & Bangalore!

As young women, let us not let our difficulty in overcoming the guilt over owning our sexuality stop us from asking a gynaecologist necessary questions – let it be guilt to gynae!

In the rapidly changing contemporary Indian society where the word SEX is still taboo, we bring you the most quintessential inhibitions answered. Have a look!

“How old are you?”, “When did you have your last period?”, “Did you have sex?”, “Protected or unprotected?” a male gynaecologist somewhere in his fifties, bombarded these heavy questions one by one at me, a naïve 21 year old then. I had just moved to Pune, one of our most cosmo cities, to pursue my higher education. Since I had been extremely homesick and stressed, I happened to miss my period.

This is how he gave the universal solution, … that I may be pregnant, scaring the hell out of me!

Unfortunately, nothing much has changed over the years. As women, we often end up treading the path of this guilt to gynae journey. Indian society holds such taboos about speaking or discussing the sexual aspect of one’s personality, that it makes asking a gynaecologist necessary questions and getting the proper professional guidance very difficult, either generally or during some problem. Especially the young girls.

The word ‘gynaecologist’ is itself symbolic of childbirth in our community. It’s only when you are pregnant or desirous of conceiving that you are expected to see a gynaecologist. But it’s time we understand that it’s a lot more than that! It is inclusive of not only pregnancy but also of sexual wellness, safe sexual practices, sexually transmitted diseases (STD’s), hormonal imbalances, improper functioning of the reproductive system and much more.

Recently I accidentally happened to come across this super fun – spunky, yet extremely informative video on a young Youtuber Sejal Kumar’s channel ‘GYNAE Q&A with mom’; wherein she takes up trivial doubts that hover over every young girl’s mind but are rarely answered. Sejal Kumar speaks to her mother, who happens to be a renowned gynecologist herself.

Check out the video here:

As we belong to the complex fast changing world, we need to break the shells around us and embrace our sexual aspect like any other. The way dynamics are changing around us, have influenced our body and health to adapt to the same. And for this, let us understand:

  1. Missing your period is NOT always suggestive of pregnancy. Thank the stars!
  2. It could be due to PCOD (Polycystic Ovarian Disease). Don’t get frightened by the complex name. It’s merely a hormonal imbalance caused due to improper eating habits, deprivation of sleep and on-the-go lifestyle generating stress and anxiety.
  3. PCOD is most commonly found in young girls in the age bracket of 18-28 years. It’s rising beyond leaps and bounds, so much so that nearly 7 out 10 today suffer from it.
  4. If sexually active, do not hesitate to talk about it. Practice safe and protected sex. Be aware of contraceptives like condoms, pills and others.
  5. Keep yourself protected against STDs by indulging with fewer number of partners and using protection.
  6. Eat healthy, sleep well and exercise daily. Visit your gynecologist regularly depending upon the need. Seek proper guidance and don’t be embarrassed to share your queries or experiences.
  7. Educate our children and younger ones about sexual instincts, body parts and sexual wellness.

We are women. We are the fore-bearers of life. Let us not be ashamed of our body. Let’s acknowledge, rise and shine. More power to us!

Image source: YouTube

Liked this post?

Become a premium user on Women’s Web and get access to exclusive content for women, plus useful Women’s Web events and resources in your city.

Women's Web is an open platform that publishes a diversity of views. Individual posts do not necessarily represent the platform's views and opinions at all times. If you have a complementary or differing point of view, you can request to be a Women's Web contributor too!

Facebook Comments

Comments

Share your thoughts! [Be civil. No personal attacks. Longer comment policy in our footer!]

Follow Women's Web

Stay updated with our Weekly Newsletter or Daily Summary - or both!

SPEAK UP. BLOG. PARTICIPATE!