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How Dare You Touch My Daughter’s Bra? This Brave Mom Refused To Take Things Lying Down

Posted: March 9, 2017
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When her daughter was harassed by a schoolmate, this brave mom refused to accept it as ‘normal’ and stood up for her daughter’s rights.

A lustful glare is what we often ignore, a lewd comment is something we may or may not respond to, an indecent touch might ignite our anger, and for that matter we are quite used to words like rape, molestation and sexual harassment.

But what would you do if a boy snaps open your daughter’s bra in her class and attempts to disrespect her in a distasteful and immodest manner?

Well, you should exactly do what the mother of this teenager did. She gave the most befitting reply to this shameless brazen classmate of her daughter by questioning the male teacher who was visibly indifferent.

“Let me touch the front of your trousers,” she retorted, on being informed of the entire episode and to the school administration’s silent plea not to label the obnoxious incident as sexual assault or harassment.

This is what happened to a school girl recently who was harassed by her batch mate. In spite of being warned, the tall and robust boy went on bullying and repeating his awful act. What happened next calls for a big applause for the 15 year old who faced it with utmost courage and punched him hard – not once but twice.

So when her mother, a nurse, was phoned and called over to lend her ears to the complaint by the school authorities, supposedly not for the sexual harassment but for the physical assault by her daughter; she shut up every inconsiderate, brash and injudicious voice in the principal’s room, in the most apt way possible.

This valiant mother remarkably, challenged the authority with the right questions. For example, she hurled at the teacher who objected to the girl’s assault rather than the grievous act these questions:

“You let him do this? Come over here and let me touch the front of your trousers.”

“If that seems inappropriate, why don’t you go and pull other female teachers’ bra or this boy’s mother’s bra? Let’s see how fun it is for them. You think they are kids and it is all fun?”

Well, everyone in the room was stunned beyond belief. No one perhaps, had imagined a rebuke of that sort.

And when the principal went on focusing on her daughter’s hitting the boy badly, she further shut them up ferociously.

“My daughter defended herself. How many times should she have let him touch her?”

All pertinent queries, a valid outburst, the righteous attitude and a justified way to deal with the ‘playful’ act, which otherwise would have been ignored and tagged unworthy of a complaint. These are the kind of women I look up to with utmost respect, the ones who have the audacity to point a finger for the right reason and raise their voice to shun the hollow cries of stereotypical mindsets.

How dare a boy as young as 15 get hold of his classmate’s under garments? Don’t we need brave moms like her, who taught her daughter to keep her head high and teach a lesson to anyone who messes with her; swiftly came to her rescue when her own teachers and the school administration sided by the culprit, besides keeping up with their fake sympathies?

Don’t we need to raise our girls by telling them strictly, not to take it when they get harassed and bullied by all kind of preying eyes around them? Why teach them to keep quiet and let the other sex take them for granted every time?  Why not teach them to pause beyond the endurance levels?

This is an certainly an inspiring example which clearly sends a message that No means only No.

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Image source: pixabay

First published here

Nandita Sharma

Nandita Sharma

I writer by 'will' , 'destiny' , 'genes', & 'profession' love to write as it is the perfect food for my soul's hunger pangs'. Writing since the age of seven, beginning with poetry, freelancing, scripting and having tried my hand at Journalism with a national daily........i have been extending my expression as i 'see & feel' the world around me. Here's my first step of opening my realm of thoughts for you. Welcome to 'my space' as i share it with you....and a hope that you find your connection here.


Author's Blog: http://Notsointellectualblogspot.com

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4 Comments


  1. Bravo to such mothers. Many of us need to emulate such women who has the presence of mind to speak against such ridicule without getting defensive.

  2. Sonia Chaavara -

    This is an excellent example of how society has chosen to turn a blind eye to the lousy upbringing of boys. Why do we not highlight often enough the bad failure of the job of bringing up decent human beings of the vast majority of boys and men who indulge in such behaviour. Why has it not been highlighted that every act of indecency on the part of boys is about weak parenting and ineffective controls of society. While girls and women have received such excellent training to discipline and deny their urges and not force themselves on others why have boys and men not been trained likewise? Unke saboon slow hai kya? We need mothers and fathers, teachers and preachers to change their focus from the girls to the boys instead and start admonishing the boys as much as they have the girls. Why are girls taught to behave respectfully and boys get away with such disrespect. Do parents only want their daughters to be decent and prefer such indecent shameful louts for sons? Or are parents just lazy when it comes to teaching their sons the rules of social civilised behaviour. Why does society assume that girls and women do not mind having a husband or father or brother or grandfather who used to be or can be so uncouth? Girls and women do not want bad boys just as boys do not want bad girls. No way! we women are just as concerned that our men do not spoil our family honour and respect and we must reject and ostracise those we find lacking in our demands. Lets pledge to put the shoe on the other foot now and see if society can train its men to be good enough for us.

    • Nandita Sharma

      it will take ages to do away with the mentality that men carry. But we definitely need more such mothers and daughters who know when to raise their voice and give it back in the way which becomes an example for others too.

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