The Price Of Going Pink

Posted: October 23, 2012

So there I was at the checkout counter at the supermarket eyeing the razors hanging from the racks next to the cashier. There were the standard blue and yellow ones in non-descript packing, promising a close shave and smooth skin. Then there were the pink ones. Attractively encased in superior packaging (which by the way, would do nothing for the quality of the shave) they winked at me as they outshone their ordinary looking compatriots.

Against my will, as I have problem with gender specific colours I inched towards the pink. This was the month to go pink after all, what with it being breast cancer awareness month. And while we are on that topic read this article by a breast cancer survivor on whether the colour of the disease is actually pink. Also this one on whether the pink products you buy this month are doing anything for breast cancer awareness or any other sort of social awareness other than making more money for the companies.

So the pink razors yes. I picked up the packet. Apart from the colour they didn’t seem all that different from their manly versions. I picked up the blue and yellow ones too to compare. I was wrong, there was quite a major difference between the two. This being the price. The pink ones were 30% more expensive.

I checked the packet to ensure that the women’s razors were not being made from precious metal mined on planet Venus. But no, we were just paying for the pink.

A little digging on the grand-daddy of all search engines proved that ‘pinking a product’ helps companies raise the price quite a lot. Take a look at the case of the pens here – Special, read snazzily coloured pens for women that cost more than regular pens.

‘Cos women cannot hold the same pens mens can, being differently abled and all that. (Please read with heavy sarcastic drawl, raised eyebrows and eyeball roll)

And then there is the case of the pink fitness gear. Yes, black boxing glove regular price. Exact same glove in pink, pay more.

And even if they are not actually pink but just products for women – you will pay more for the same thing.

Soaps, shampoos, deodorants.

No wonder baby clothes are segregated into pink and blue. It seems like Marketers want to make sure that we women are conditioned  from the crib.

What do you think? Would you pay more for pink?

Pic credit: Premier Packaging (Used under a Creative Commons license)


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  1. Pingback: Best Of Women’s Web – Editor’s Pick For Oct 2012 | Women's Web: Online Community For Indian Women

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